5 Steps to Unlocking Your Dream Memories

This post is also available in: itItaliano (Italian)

 

How to remember your dreams

Over the years, I have heard several people complain that they “never dream” or that they find it really difficult to remember any dreams when they wake up in the morning. This is a pity! Not remembering dreams denies people one of the most frequent opportunities to hear from their departed loved ones, since it is when we are disconnected from the stimuli of our physical lives that we are most open to after death communication. On the other hand, it is quite natural for other people to remember their dreams. The luckiest seem to be those who get a chance to meet their loved ones in lucid dreams, that is in dreams when we are aware that we are dreaming. During a lucid dream, it is possible to consciously interact with the dream landscape and with our departed loved ones who might be visiting at the time.

So I decided it might be a good idea to write a post, based on my own personal experience, to provide some practical advice that may help those who appear to be struggling to remember their dreams and take advantage of this wonderful opening to connect with their inner selves and with the Afterlife, the amazing world that lies beyond this world.

First of all, I feel that it is very important to realise that everyone dreams: if we could not dream, we would probably die. Even though science has taken an interest in researching dreams only recently, with the birth of psychoanalysis, the invention of instruments that may detect and measure dream parameters (such as the electroencephalograph, which was first used in 1924) and the observation of Rapid Eye Movements occurring during REM sleep and related sleep cycles, I believe there is no question about the fact that humans have always wondered about the meaning that dreams carry and ascribed to them mysterious powers related to contacting the Divine or supernatural and/or non-physical entities.

I feel it is also worthwhile considering that we spend almost one-third of our physical lives sleeping, disconnected from most of our physical stimuli, in order to rest, heal, reset our vital functions, process our daily life experiences and any related hopes, fears and expectations, creating our future and much more. One-third of our physical lives represents a really large amount of time which, if better invested, might really offer us a lot of happiness.

Step 1 – If necessary, research the subject, acknowledge and become convinced that we all dream, even if we do not remember

With the exception of occasional or regular naps we may take during the day – when we are not as exhausted as we would be at the end of the day – the first dreams we have after falling asleep are usually brief and, practically speaking, more difficult to remember if we have just started training. It is much easier to work with the last dreams we have towards dawn. Indeed, the longest and most interesting dream tends to be the last one we have before waking up, when we have already rested for several hours and had a chance to process any concerns with our earlier dreams. This is even truer if we get a chance to sleep an extra hour and have no pressing engagements causing us to leap out of bed.

Even if we are sure that we are unable to remember our dreams, the important thing now is to set up a daily strategy aimed at regularly keeping track of any fleeting insights transpiring from a night’s sleep, even if we do not yet realise that this is possible.

All we need to devote to this programme is 1 or 2 minutes a day, as long as we commit to carry out this task regularly and in line with the rules we will have set for ourselves.

As with all new habits we try to form, this need not be an easy task to start with, despite the little time and effort it requires. In the beginning, it may actually feel like we are stepping out of our comfort zone, but do not worry: your efforts will be soon rewarded.

Step 2 – Commit to devote 1 or 2 minutes a day to your project, patiently and with perseverance

For the purpose of recording any dream-related memories, I recommend you use a tool you like, that is attractive and inviting, something that is a pleasure to use. For instance, I have always loved organisers for some reason, but somebody else may choose a notebook, a loose-leaf exercise book, a luxury writing pad, one’s mobile, tablet or iPad, or a voice recorder. I have a friend who is a professional painter and loves to create her own journals and notebooks, by using recycled paper, coloured cardboard and ribbons, which she personally decorates depending on the use they are meant for.

Step 3 – Choose a dream-catching tool that you like and find inviting

Once you have selected your recording tool, it is time to take action. We may choose to place our data gathering/processing tool in a strategic position that is within reach, together with a pen, pencil, or hi-tech pencil – if necessary – and get into the habit of writing down or recording every day something we might remember or simply have on our mind upon waking up. In the beginning, you may simply enter a few words to describe the mood you were in upon waking up, the feeling you had, a word or sentence you might have had in mind, a melody, a scent… anything you suspect you might have been even only vaguely aware of just before waking up. Recent studies have provided evidence that, during our sleep, our perception of time changes dramatically and a single instant may turn out to be the source of an amazing amount of memories.

Every single detail deserves to be reported in our case, so it is important not to neglect anything. The important thing at this stage is to realise how important this brief daily task is! In practice, what we are doing is training a muscle that is not being used yet and therefore only needs a little amount of daily exercise to gradually get fit for its job. When we join a gym, we know that, thanks to a regular commitment, we will eventually obtain our desired results. In this case, we are creating the same type of positive expectation, knowing for sure that the muscle we are exercising will become fit and healthy, and require increasingly less effort to work. Every memory you have upon waking up, even the most ephemeral, may in turn trigger another one. As we continue with our daily exercise and bring to light our nighttime experiences, our level of confidence and quickness of mind will increase dramatically. We will be excited to find out that certain dreams are in fact connected and possibly recurring, just waiting for us to become aware of them and lead to the next.

Step 4 – Take action

Now that we know that all we need to do is train and build a muscle with just 1 or 2 minutes of exercise a day, we will find it much easier to simply expect to remember our dreams and free these memories from the place in which they have been secluded all along. The positive expectation and confidence that will build up, in turn, will bring to the surface wonderfully vivid experiences, including unexpected meetings with our departed loved ones who find in dreams the easiest way to stay in touch with us. All we need to do, at this stage, is consolidate our routine, by creating, if we so desire, some kind of ritual that may strengthen our motivation, perseverance and dedication.

In my case, for instance, I love to wake up with a stimulating and fragrant cup of coffee, as I enjoy the blissful quietness I am entitled to as a natural early waker. However, there are countless factors that can make this time of your day unique and motivating, so that you may more easily focus on recollecting what you were experiencing a moment before waking up.

Step 5 – Create a routine

We will soon find out that, even though in the beginning our memory need not display constant performance levels, if we manage to write down or record at least a few words or insights each day, the volume of information we daily report will gradually start to increase and, depending on the time we wish or can make available for this task, we may reach the point of reporting several long dreams per night.

I would, therefore, like to encourage all those who hope for their departed loved ones to visit in their dreams to identify this muscle we are building as some kind of thread connecting our physical world to the world of disincarnates, two worlds that are only apparently separate. With a minimum daily practice, this thread will soon turn into a door that we can choose to leave open upon waking up, at least for the time required to report our dreams.

Like many other Afterlife researchers, I firmly believe this physical life is in fact just a dream compared to the greater, eternal life our spirit is always aware of. By consciously opening the door that leads into our dream life, we can find out for ourselves that the Afterlife is truly here at hand and that these few minutes of daily training can help us regain awareness about this fact. In other words, it is as if our loved ones were living in the room next door: the door is never locked and is literally flung open every time we dream. It is up to us to train so that it does not snap shut when we wake up and we can bring to light the wonderful awareness that death is an illusion and that we are always together.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *